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    July 2, 2021
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Business Insight Presented by Arlington Dermatology Pediatric Skin Problems Children suffer from exactly the same medical problems when it comes to skin disorders as their parents or grandparents. While their skin is easier to heal and is better hydrated, many skin disorders are associated with immune system and many are genetic. It does not have to be the straight-line mother or father who is the genetic 'giver'. It might very well be genes hidden in grandparents code or uncles' or aunts'. As much as we know about genetics and how it moves forward with mutations and inheritance, we are very far from understanding it all. Pediatric medications are much more difficult to develop. First of all, before the science starts working on the pediatric version of a new drug, an adult version is usually approved. This means that the 'new' drug is not so new because it had been tried and studied by hundreds of adults and is showing a good level of safety and effectiveness in treating the disease. Secondly, the new drug must go through a cycle of pediatric studies, with exactly the population of the target patients in the future. Pediatric trials are very difficult. The challenges are not coming from the trials themselves. These are usually very easy and simple compared to the adult studies. What the biggest challenge is, is enrollment, It is very complicated to identify and convince parents of young children to allow the children to be a part of clinical trial. Unless this is the only option or a life-threatening condition, science has yet to come up with a better practice of encouraging both, parents and children, to participate. It is not a simple matter and opinions are extremely challenging to discuss. There is always some unknown possibility of a side effect in children that is not observed in adults. There boundary. There is one very important message we forget about: there will be no new medications for children unless we agree to participate in pediatric clinical studies. Period. What it means is simply that many drugs will be available for adult patients and they will benefit adult population and our children will have no chances to use these drugs. This is not what we want. We want science to work for our children and we want our children to benefit from new medical developments. Please, try to speak to a parent of a 10-year-old with severe psoriasis. It is not just psoriasis they suffer from. It is often a family distress and depression. It is arguments and dysfunction between the parents who are lost in how to help their child. Medical problems with no medication available in pediatric population are a big issue extending far beyond any given disease. Please, talk to your doctor or a pediatrician but if you are not happy with answers, reach out to doctors who conduct clinical research. Ask for as much information as you can. You may find a new way how to help your child. is a number of procedures like ECGS or blood testing that are not pleasant for children. And there is a lot of general anxiety, also among doctors, on whether some outcomes of the study might be seen in many years to come. All of the above are possible situations. And not only am I aware of them but I feel similar concerns myself. As a parent and as a doctor. However, I must admit, most of these concerns are emotional and not logical and scientific. This is because children are dependent on us, parents, and we love them and protect them, sometimes without logical Michael Bukhalo, MD Arlington Dermatology 5301 Keystone Court Rolling Meadows, IL 60008 Tel. 847 392 5440 | www.arlingtondermatology.net Business Insight Presented by Arlington Dermatology Pediatric Skin Problems Children suffer from exactly the same medical problems when it comes to skin disorders as their parents or grandparents. While their skin is easier to heal and is better hydrated, many skin disorders are associated with immune system and many are genetic. It does not have to be the straight-line mother or father who is the genetic 'giver'. It might very well be genes hidden in grandparents code or uncles' or aunts'. As much as we know about genetics and how it moves forward with mutations and inheritance, we are very far from understanding it all. Pediatric medications are much more difficult to develop. First of all, before the science starts working on the pediatric version of a new drug, an adult version is usually approved. This means that the 'new' drug is not so new because it had been tried and studied by hundreds of adults and is showing a good level of safety and effectiveness in treating the disease. Secondly, the new drug must go through a cycle of pediatric studies, with exactly the population of the target patients in the future. Pediatric trials are very difficult. The challenges are not coming from the trials themselves. These are usually very easy and simple compared to the adult studies. What the biggest challenge is, is enrollment, It is very complicated to identify and convince parents of young children to allow the children to be a part of clinical trial. Unless this is the only option or a life-threatening condition, science has yet to come up with a better practice of encouraging both, parents and children, to participate. It is not a simple matter and opinions are extremely challenging to discuss. There is always some unknown possibility of a side effect in children that is not observed in adults. There boundary. There is one very important message we forget about: there will be no new medications for children unless we agree to participate in pediatric clinical studies. Period. What it means is simply that many drugs will be available for adult patients and they will benefit adult population and our children will have no chances to use these drugs. This is not what we want. We want science to work for our children and we want our children to benefit from new medical developments. Please, try to speak to a parent of a 10-year-old with severe psoriasis. It is not just psoriasis they suffer from. It is often a family distress and depression. It is arguments and dysfunction between the parents who are lost in how to help their child. Medical problems with no medication available in pediatric population are a big issue extending far beyond any given disease. Please, talk to your doctor or a pediatrician but if you are not happy with answers, reach out to doctors who conduct clinical research. Ask for as much information as you can. You may find a new way how to help your child. is a number of procedures like ECGS or blood testing that are not pleasant for children. And there is a lot of general anxiety, also among doctors, on whether some outcomes of the study might be seen in many years to come. All of the above are possible situations. And not only am I aware of them but I feel similar concerns myself. As a parent and as a doctor. However, I must admit, most of these concerns are emotional and not logical and scientific. This is because children are dependent on us, parents, and we love them and protect them, sometimes without logical Michael Bukhalo, MD Arlington Dermatology 5301 Keystone Court Rolling Meadows, IL 60008 Tel. 847 392 5440 | www.arlingtondermatology.net