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Business Insight Presented by Arlington Dermatology Celebration of Life I am writing this on the 4th of July. Every year, I rest and enjoy my family time on that day but I also take time to go back in my readings and re-fresh my memory of the American Constitution, Declaration of Independence, and some other historical documents that shaped the country we live in. I also try to be realistic and live in the present time: not everything in history can be applied easily to the 21st century. George Washington did not have a cell phone and Hamilton did not understand genetics. They did understand human relations and they predicted that some human flaws will be universally valid in the years to come. The language of many of the past historical documents is not easy and I bet that many Americans never really read the Constitution or The Declaration. They often repeat statements of things' being un-constitutional but when asked how the Constitution defines those things', they do not have answers. Let's re-fresh some thoughts. The Declaration of Independence, the very áth of July document we celebrate today, starts with a super-universal statement: .We hokl these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among them these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.." When you read these words, you can easily identify that some values our Founding Fathers discussed were uplifted to the level of the Creator, They did not say God, or identify any particular religion, they used a word Creator, which applies to every religion I know. They also spoke about Rights: Life, Liberty, times. and pursuit of Happiness. While they were writing these words in the newly created United States, the values they pointed are universally applicable to our current States. Instead it says: '.And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes, Lives, Fortunes, and Honor. Pledge to each other. It is worth reading and reflecting upon even though, historically, circumstances are totally different from today's and our sacred Honor... In the years of the 19th and 20th century, we were reminded of some universal thoughts coming from the 4th of July 1776. We were also every country I know. 75% of the Declaration of Independence is about what the Founding Father did not want to see: repetition of 'history of the present King of Britain, and his tyranny over the people and the land he proclaimed his.' The Declaration lists an abundant number of the King's flaws, absolute inconsideration of Laws, and destruction of people. It refers to people on the land of Britain but also to many colonies under the governance of the King. It my fellow Americans: ask not what your country is worth reading. In other words, The Declaration of Independence was a document proclaiming the separation of the 13 newly created United States of America from the tyranny and abolishing all the reminded that, while the United States started in 1776, America was born much earlier and not all its history we should be proud of. Yet, this year's July áth 2021 is a true celebration of life after 18 months long struggle with the powers of nature. Let me leave you with another quote, fully cited from President Kennedy Inaugural speech and the reminder of who we should be, not only as Americans but the citizens of the world :'..And so, can do for you-ask what you can do for your country. My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can connections with the States of Great Britain. do for the freedom of man. The definition of how the Government should work is not included in the document, at least not in the form that was applied in the history to Michael Bukhalo, MD Arlington Dermatology 5301 Keystone Court Rolling Meadows, IL 60008 Tel. 847 392 5440 | www.arlingtondermatology.net Business Insight Presented by Arlington Dermatology Celebration of Life I am writing this on the 4th of July. Every year, I rest and enjoy my family time on that day but I also take time to go back in my readings and re-fresh my memory of the American Constitution, Declaration of Independence, and some other historical documents that shaped the country we live in. I also try to be realistic and live in the present time: not everything in history can be applied easily to the 21st century. George Washington did not have a cell phone and Hamilton did not understand genetics. They did understand human relations and they predicted that some human flaws will be universally valid in the years to come. The language of many of the past historical documents is not easy and I bet that many Americans never really read the Constitution or The Declaration. They often repeat statements of things' being un-constitutional but when asked how the Constitution defines those things', they do not have answers. Let's re-fresh some thoughts. The Declaration of Independence, the very áth of July document we celebrate today, starts with a super-universal statement: .We hokl these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among them these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.." When you read these words, you can easily identify that some values our Founding Fathers discussed were uplifted to the level of the Creator, They did not say God, or identify any particular religion, they used a word Creator, which applies to every religion I know. They also spoke about Rights: Life, Liberty, times. and pursuit of Happiness. While they were writing these words in the newly created United States, the values they pointed are universally applicable to our current States. Instead it says: '.And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes, Lives, Fortunes, and Honor. Pledge to each other. It is worth reading and reflecting upon even though, historically, circumstances are totally different from today's and our sacred Honor... In the years of the 19th and 20th century, we were reminded of some universal thoughts coming from the 4th of July 1776. We were also every country I know. 75% of the Declaration of Independence is about what the Founding Father did not want to see: repetition of 'history of the present King of Britain, and his tyranny over the people and the land he proclaimed his.' The Declaration lists an abundant number of the King's flaws, absolute inconsideration of Laws, and destruction of people. It refers to people on the land of Britain but also to many colonies under the governance of the King. It my fellow Americans: ask not what your country is worth reading. In other words, The Declaration of Independence was a document proclaiming the separation of the 13 newly created United States of America from the tyranny and abolishing all the reminded that, while the United States started in 1776, America was born much earlier and not all its history we should be proud of. Yet, this year's July áth 2021 is a true celebration of life after 18 months long struggle with the powers of nature. Let me leave you with another quote, fully cited from President Kennedy Inaugural speech and the reminder of who we should be, not only as Americans but the citizens of the world :'..And so, can do for you-ask what you can do for your country. My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can connections with the States of Great Britain. do for the freedom of man. The definition of how the Government should work is not included in the document, at least not in the form that was applied in the history to Michael Bukhalo, MD Arlington Dermatology 5301 Keystone Court Rolling Meadows, IL 60008 Tel. 847 392 5440 | www.arlingtondermatology.net