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    July 23, 2021
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Business Insight Presented by Arlington Dermatology Has the pandemic changed us? Do you remember the world before December of 2019? It was then considered 'normal'. Starting in January 2020, we were told to wash our hands more frequently, stay out of crowds, stay home, wear masks, stay away by 6 feet, work from home, and many other local and national restrictions. Some of us avoided the infection. Some other got it and were sick, for days and for weeks. Over 600,000 people died in the USA. While medical information continued changing, which the new virus and no prior data, many new sources of information or rather misinformation started growing with a speed of light. Some of the misinformation was and is so ridiculous that we may have a hard time trusting that anybody could believe it. Yet, some do. Vaccines are helpful and widely available, and they do save lives. Developed too fast? Life is too fast. Polio vaccine was developing for several years in the '60s, but we did not have cell phones then and now, we update our cellphone every year. It is technology that allowed the vaccines to during the driveway repair. The phones be available so quickly and lucky that we can use them. Definitely, we are not out of the woods yet. Illinois reported 670 new cases and 4 deaths on Monday this week. This is 3 times more new cases than 2 weeks that they will continue doing 75% of work ago. Huge majority of severe cases and hospitalizations are unvaccinated people. Vaccines protect but are not perfect, 99% is a great result but it is not 100% security. So, have we learned our lessons? Are we going to be better about following the rules and protecting each other? Based on what we see on the news, probably not. We continue discussing masks at school and not because of lack of business but and crowded mask-wearing. Thousands of people were called back to the offices and decided not to go and rather seek and computers. It is partially the price options to work from home. It seems like some places I attend from time to time changed. The other day, I stopped at our local Mariano's. Not during the shopping re-invented itself, the better for us. The rush but there were customers at every pandemic was only a small reason for department. There was not a single cashier there: all personal cashier service was replaced with self-checking and one store individual was assisting with errors and confusions. My office had to call out neighboring was obvious with businesses to assist with the parking were always picked up promptly, but it turned out that all office personnel were working from home only. Their parking lot was almost empty, and they really did not need it. Their office person explained from home and their customers do not mind and do not even realize. I probably could continue examples like this. I am not sure we have changed personally. Perhaps some of us have. But the world around us has changed. And we will not be going to the 'old normal". I am afraid many jobs will not come back because of modernization, automation, replacement of human hands by scanners of progress, but it definitely coincided with the pandemic. I think we have no choice but to start changing. The sooner we realize what disappeared and what that. Our world continues speeding. Michael Bukhalo, MD Arlington Dermatology 5301 Keystone Court Rolling Meadows, IL 60008 Tel. 847 392 5440 | www.arlingtondermatology.net Business Insight Presented by Arlington Dermatology Has the pandemic changed us? Do you remember the world before December of 2019? It was then considered 'normal'. Starting in January 2020, we were told to wash our hands more frequently, stay out of crowds, stay home, wear masks, stay away by 6 feet, work from home, and many other local and national restrictions. Some of us avoided the infection. Some other got it and were sick, for days and for weeks. Over 600,000 people died in the USA. While medical information continued changing, which the new virus and no prior data, many new sources of information or rather misinformation started growing with a speed of light. Some of the misinformation was and is so ridiculous that we may have a hard time trusting that anybody could believe it. Yet, some do. Vaccines are helpful and widely available, and they do save lives. Developed too fast? Life is too fast. Polio vaccine was developing for several years in the '60s, but we did not have cell phones then and now, we update our cellphone every year. It is technology that allowed the vaccines to during the driveway repair. The phones be available so quickly and lucky that we can use them. Definitely, we are not out of the woods yet. Illinois reported 670 new cases and 4 deaths on Monday this week. This is 3 times more new cases than 2 weeks that they will continue doing 75% of work ago. Huge majority of severe cases and hospitalizations are unvaccinated people. Vaccines protect but are not perfect, 99% is a great result but it is not 100% security. So, have we learned our lessons? Are we going to be better about following the rules and protecting each other? Based on what we see on the news, probably not. We continue discussing masks at school and not because of lack of business but and crowded mask-wearing. Thousands of people were called back to the offices and decided not to go and rather seek and computers. It is partially the price options to work from home. It seems like some places I attend from time to time changed. The other day, I stopped at our local Mariano's. Not during the shopping re-invented itself, the better for us. The rush but there were customers at every pandemic was only a small reason for department. There was not a single cashier there: all personal cashier service was replaced with self-checking and one store individual was assisting with errors and confusions. My office had to call out neighboring was obvious with businesses to assist with the parking were always picked up promptly, but it turned out that all office personnel were working from home only. Their parking lot was almost empty, and they really did not need it. Their office person explained from home and their customers do not mind and do not even realize. I probably could continue examples like this. I am not sure we have changed personally. Perhaps some of us have. But the world around us has changed. And we will not be going to the 'old normal". I am afraid many jobs will not come back because of modernization, automation, replacement of human hands by scanners of progress, but it definitely coincided with the pandemic. I think we have no choice but to start changing. The sooner we realize what disappeared and what that. Our world continues speeding. Michael Bukhalo, MD Arlington Dermatology 5301 Keystone Court Rolling Meadows, IL 60008 Tel. 847 392 5440 | www.arlingtondermatology.net